Eedris Abdulkareem, the Nigerian rapper, left many of his fans worried on Wednesday when news circulated that he is battling kidney failure.

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It is understood that the singer has been undergoing dialysis. Eedris is also expected to undergo a kidney transplant at the end of July.

According to Kidney.org, although more women than men have chronic kidney disease (CKD), men are more likely to reach kidney failure sooner than women.

Using the United States as a case study in 2021, the CDC reported that people aged 65 years or older (38%) are more prone to kidney disease than people aged 45–64 years (12%) or 18–44 years (6%).

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WHAT IS KIDNEY FAILURE?

Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, is a condition in which one or both kidneys lose the ability to sufficiently filter waste from the blood.

Normally, the kidneys are designed to filter the blood and remove toxins from the body. So kidney failure occurs when the organ can not function well on its own anymore.

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The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that if one’s kidney function drops below 15 percent of normal, the person is said to have kidney failure.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF KIDNEY FAILURE?

There are basically two types of kidney failure — acute and chronic.

  • Acute kidney failure

Also called acute renal failure, it occurs abruptly and may last for a few days or hours.

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It may occur due to trauma to the kidney or decreased blood flow in the area. It can also occur due to a blockage, such as a kidney stone, or very high blood pressure.

Acute kidney failure is often reversible with immediate treatment.

  • Chronic kidney failure

Also known as chronic renal failure, chronic kidney failure eventually occurs when there has been gradual damage to the kidney over time.

WHAT ARE THE CAUSES OF KIDNEY FAILURE?

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Kidney failure is mostly caused by diabetes and high blood pressure.

However, acute kidney failure can also be caused by;

  • Low blood flow to the kidneys
  • Inflammation
  • Direct damage to the kidneys
  • Blockages, sometimes due to kidney stones
  • Severe dehydration

Apart from diabetes and high blood pressure, the following can also cause chronic kidney issues;

  • Heart disease
  • Hereditary
  • Lupus

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF KIDNEY FAILURE?

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The symptoms tend to be unnoticeable in the early stage of kidney failure.

According to the CDC, 90% of people with chronic kidney disease don’t know they have it.

However, here are the symptoms of kidney failure.

  • Extreme tiredness
  • Upset stomach or vomiting
  • Confusion or trouble concentrating
  • Swelling, especially around your hands or ankles
  • Muscle cramps
  • Dry or itchy skin
  • Poor appetite or metallic taste of food
  • Reduced amount of urine
  • Shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in your chest

WHAT ARE THE TREATMENTS FOR KIDNEY FAILURE?

There are two major treatments which are dialysis and kidney transplant.

  • Dialysis

Dialysis is a treatment that filters and purifies the blood using a dialyzer machine.

The machine helps performs the healthy function of the kidneys.

Dialysis doesn’t cure kidney failure. However, with regular treatment, a person’s quality of life can be improved.

  • Kidney transplant

Here, doctors place a healthy kidney in the affected person’s body to take over the job of the damaged organs.

A transplant isn’t always the right treatment option for everyone. It’s mostly suitable for people with permanent kidney damage or with 20% or less kidney function.

PREVENTION MEASURES

The risk of developing kidney failure can be decreased when one;

  • Limits alcohol intake
  • Stops smoking
  • Eats a healthy diet; limits food high in protein, sodium, potassium, and phosphorus
  • Maintains a healthy weight
  • Exercises regularly
  • Monitor your kidney function, with the help of a doctor
  • Keep your blood sugar levels under control, if you have diabetes
  • Keep your blood pressure levels in a normal range



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