Falana neither fits into a box nor dances to the tune of any musical stereotype.

The singer, whose music has elements of poetry, jazz, soul, rhythm, and percussion, does not have a particular genre.

Some have labelled her an Afro-fusion sensation, but Falana enjoys the luxury of not being restricted by categorisation.

Like a bird, she seeks to fly and roam through the skies of sound, unhindered.

SOUND & INFLUENCES

In a recent interview with TheCable Lifestyle, the singer made it known that music is her natural form of expression and revealed that her musical inspiration is basically a reflection of who she is, and the kind of music she enjoys.

“I am just trying to be myself in a very simple sense. Music that is raw and honest resonates most of me,” said Falana.

Lauryn Hill and Nina Simone, she said, have greatly influenced her style of writing, and added that Frank Ocean and SIA are some of the modern artistes whose writing she admires.

Although she has a refined taste, Falana is open to all sounds of music.

Music has always been her passion and it was inevitable that she’d tow the path of the bohemian – strumming on guitar strings, writing in the dead of the night and belting out powerful tunes.

“Some people are comfortable with suppressing their passions, others aren’t, I am one of those people that aren’t,” she said while explaining that she comes alive and becomes an entirely different person on stage.

Falana says she's comfortable with her sound
Falana says she’s comfortable with her sound

MAINSTREAM MUSIC

In many music markets around the world, sounds that appeal to the mainstream audience tend to have greater commercial value.

The chances of fame are high and creative returns are much more guaranteed.

But Falana is not moved by the thought of all that, maintaining that the most successful sound is that which people can relate to.

“I am who I am…..and so I create what makes sense to me,” Falana said when asked if mainstream music would ever be an option.

She believes the market in Nigeria is large enough and strongly disagrees that most Nigerians appreciate one-dimensional music.

“I think historically if we look back and we see the kind of music people listened to in the 70’s and 60’s that means there’s a capacity for Nigerians to like diverse music”, said the singer who cited Onyeka Owenu and King Sunny Ade as examples.

Falana noted that she has enjoyed positive reception thus far while narrating her most humbling experience.

It was a comment made about her music – that it’s the type one listens to “when you’re going through something or feel introspective and you want to indulge in your emotions”.

Harping on the creative ways she expresses herself, Falana said she would like to dabble in visual arts.

She strongly opined that every creative individual has the capacity to create in different mediums, stressing that a lack of technical skills to execute isn’t really a barrier because an artiste can always communicate ideas to someone who can enhance them.

Falana wants her music to reach as far as possible
Falana wants her music to reach as far as possible

EXPANDING HER FRONTIERS

Falana’s first project, an EP of five songs titled ‘Things Fall Together’ was released in Cuba, and having been active for two years, she says Nigeria, Canada and Cuba are the countries where she has gotten the most encouraging reception.

The evolution of technology, she believes, has made it easier for music to cross borders.

“It would be silly if I were to limit myself to one place. So if I’m making music and someone half way across the world can relate to it then that’s amazing,” said Falana.

What keeps Falana going? TheCable Lifestyle asked.

“Self-motivation is the most sustaining form of motivation”, she quipped, while attributing a chunk of the support she gets to her family and friends.



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